New Zone-10 Website


Welcome to the original Zone-10 Website. This has been replaced by the new website which should be accessable by directly going to 
www.zone-10.com . The direct link is http://www.zone-10.com/d1  and should load directly.

 

This original site will be shut down  by May 1, 2017.

Olympus E-5
Best FourThirds DSLR? Olympus E-5 Review, Part 4 of 5

Best Ever FourThirds DSLR?

What to and not to expect from the new Olympus E-5

 

Modelo de preproducción (firmware 1.0)

 

Khen Lim, Zone-10

 
Part 4 of 5
 
 
0405-00E-5; 1/100 sec, f3.2, Aperture-AE, ISO 1600, 0.0EV, ESP, no flash, 14-54mm at 36mm, AWB (Art #0405-00) 
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Best FourThirds DSLR? Olympus E-5 Review, Part 3 of 5

Best Ever FourThirds DSLR?

What to and not to expect from the new Olympus E-5

 

Modelo de preproducción (firmware 1.0)

 

Khen Lim, Zone-10

 

Part 3 of 5

 

0305-00  

It is possible that the E-5 is the most versatile all-rounder pro-grade DSLR in the market (Art #0305-00) 

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Best FourThirds DSLR? Olympus E-5 Review, Part 2 of 5
 Part 2 of 5: Feature Summary (cont’d)

0205-00

The old new or is it the new old? (Art #0205-00)

E-3, 1/5 sec, f3.5, Aperture-AE, ISO 800, +0.3EV, ESP, no flash, 14-54mm at 54mm, AWB
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Best FourThirds DSLR? Olympus E-5 Review, Part 1 of 5

Modelo de preproducción (firmware 1.0)

 

0105-00-620 

Could this possibly be a modern classic in the making? (Art #0105-01)

 

 

 

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The Olympus E-5 Compared - Part 6 of 6

- Product and Feature Uniqueness

- Feasability, Influence and Feature

- Comparative Technical Specifications

 

 

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The Olympus E-5 Compared - Part 5 of 6

- Miscellaneous Features, Options and Highlights

- Power Management

 

 

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The Olympus E-5 Compared - Part 4 of 6

- Flash Management System

- LCD Monitor, Control Panel, Playback and LiveView Operability

- Memory Cards and Connectivity Standards

 

 

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The Olympus E-5 Compared - Part 3 of 6

- Metering Patterns, Exposure Modes and Systems including Creative Art Filters and My Mode/My Set

- Colour Temperature and White Balance Systems

- Shutter Speeds and Shutter System

- File Formats and Operating Modes

 

 

 

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The Olympus E-5 Compared - Part 2 of 6

- Sensor and Processor

- Viewfinder and Focusing Screen

- Autofocusing Technologies and Systems - Standard and LiveView

 

 

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The Olympus E-5 Compared - Part 1 of 6

- Market: Launch Date, Street Price

- Physical Comparisons

- Dimensions

 

 

 

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Going With the Flow - The Olympus E-5

Is the Olympus E-5 the point where we get out of the Olympus river, or should we go with the flow? Is it time to sell the FourThirds gear or should we continue to use this system.

 

Any decision to change systems should not be taken lightly. One must take into account the considerable costs involved in selling and buying equipment. One must also consider the time spent learning not only new equipment, but how to alter processing techniques for the files.

 

The E-5 represents a high-watermark for legacy FourThirds. Will we see another pro-grade DSLR from Olympus supporting exclusively the FourThirds mount? Possible, but probably doubtful. Micro FourThirds appears to be the future of the format and it is only a matter of time before CDAF and EVFs will catch up to PDAF and OVFs. That time might be closer than we think. Choosing to buy an E-5 is an individual choice based ONLY on the specific requirements of the individual. We should never base our purchasing decisions on what somebody else has, but we should base our purchasing decisions solely on our needs. Each person must define exactly what those needs are.

 

When you contemplate whether or not to get the E-5, think about these factors:

 

1. Olympus has the best in-camera JPEG files in the industry. Most people shoot RAW not because they really want to, but because they have to. If the camera is able to nail the exposure or get reasonably close in-camera, then the only reason to shoot RAW would be "insurance". Khen Lim is in this category. He is perfectly comfortable shooting in-camera JPEGs of weddings, events and so forth. The resulting files require very little additional manipulation and editing. He shoots for final product in-camera. You CAN do this with Olympus, most systems you can't.

 

2. The Digital Zuikos are typically the finest lenses in each price category. You have three price-tiers for almost every zoom range. All except the bottom tier of lenses are weather and dust sealed while being built very ruggedly. Within each equivelent focal-length range, the DZ lenses are smaller than the competition and usually represent a wider usable range. The lenses, alone, are reason to stay with Olympus.

 

3. Common wisdom says that larger formats will always be superior, image-qualitywise, compared to FourThirds. When same sensor and processing technology is used, this would be true. But we do reach a point of diminishing-returns beyond a certain point. Is the Canon 5D totally obsolete even though the 5Dmk2 is better? Of course not. It produced brilliant image files then and it still produces brilliant image files. The Nikon D3 and D700 have relatively low pixel counts, yet they too have excellent image quality. The point is, you must determine what your technical requirements are solely on what your customers demand--not on what you think must be better because it's newer, prettier or more expensive. Think about how your pictures are used--unless you are a commercial photographer, or make bedspread-sized prints at 300 ppi, you're going to be hard-pressed to actually see any difference between cameras. Other aspects of the imaging system will have a greater bearing. Processing and sensor technology keeps advancing. If the E-5 is as good or better than the 5D and D700 then is the arguement over image-quality a moot point?

 

4. The E-5 is the best FourThirds camera to date. Period. Does it make sense to upgrade to the E-5 from the E-3? Maybe, maybe not. We won't know until the image tests are done. But does it make sense to upgrade from other FourThirds cameras--including the E-1? Yes. There is a point where good is good enough and for nearly all photographic applications, the E-5 has reached that point of sufficiency. As a professional photographer I KNOW that the E-5 would be more than sufficient for me in all but the rarest of circumstances. Each of us must then weigh the costs and determine whether or not the return on investment is adequate. Unfortunately, it is the rare circumstance which I, as a professional photographer, must also accomodate.

 

5. Consider the options. If you are just looking for the "New Shiny", the E-5 represents little to get excited about. It's REAL strengths are not in features or specifications, but in real honest-to-goodness usability. The camera is a rarity in this day and age when you feel like every camera is running on Windows Vista. If you want to get a camera which is "more-better" then get the Panasonic GH2. With the adaptor, this camera uses FourThirds lenses and offers all of the advantages of Micro FourThirds as well as very good HD Video capture.

 

7. Be very careful when buying new cameras. Learn from the cameras you've already purchased. Why do you want to replace what you have now? What's wrong with it? Why did YOU CHANGE?  That camera has the same limitations now as it did when you purchased it. Look at the new camera and envision yourself two years from now with that camera and think about what will be causing you to look for the next camera? The E-5 doesn't bring anything new, but it is complete. It is a top-grade camera worthy of long-term and extreme usage. The E-5 is only the third pro-grade FourThirds or Micro Fourthirds camera to come along. Many models of non-pro cameras have come and gone. Where is the excitement for the E-510 that you had when you just HAD to get it because it was better than the previous camera? A top-grade camera is in a different league than a consumer camera inspite of lower specs and feature counts. The camera doesn't fight you, it doesn't get in the way, it just works--allowing you, the photographer, to get the shot without excuses.

 

Go with the flow. Don't let the rocks in the river slow you down. If you have reason to upgrade to the E-5, do so. Your lenses will thank you.

 

Ken Norton

Zone-10

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Naked Gun E-5 and FourThirds - The Final Insult

Olympus officially introduces the new E-5. Essentially a warmed-over E-3 or an E-30 in E-3 body. Move along, people--nothing to see here.

 

On a personal note, I'm extremely disappointed with Olympus for two reasons:

 

1. After three years this is the best they could do?

2. Why didn't they do something like this with the E-1 in those four years before the E-3 came out?

 

Olympus, you are a creative company that has proven through the years to be the maverick in every industry you compete in. The E-5 is the opposite of what the very fabric of this company is all about.

 

But not all is bad. At least Olympus finally put a decent LCD on it. Way to step out!

 

If you are needing to buy a new pro-level Olympus DSLR, the E-5 is fine. In fact, it's probably quite good as it blends the best of the E-3 with the improved imaging capabilities seen in the E-PL1. It will definitely not be a slouch in image quality. However, it is obvious that Olympus has lost all interest in legacy FourThirds. The E-5 is a protection for existing investment in lenses and accessories, but at this point I won't be recommending any non Micro FourThirds products to anybody not already invested in the line.

 

Ken Norton

Zone-10

 

 

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